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Mini Update

IMG_4974IMG_4975 IMG_4976 IMG_4977 IMG_4978Ok so here are a few pics of the Owner of IMS Scott Wright and his 2014 BMW 1200GSA.  This was taken along Engineers Pass near Ouray Colorado.  More to come.  As you can see the KLIM gear still looks great after two days and 850 plus miles and then another many miles of dirt riding.  The bike (as all BMWs do) performed great even with the street type tires, the different traction control settings alone with the D-ESA helped a ton in making it a smooth ride in the dirt, but even without the GS series are just great ADV bikes.

Also as you can see in the first pic the new IMS ADV 1 foot pegs provide a great standing platform, allowing much more of your foot to be in contact with the peg, giving you more control and more comfort.

 

Update and Apology

Ok, so first the apology.  We knew where we were going would have no cell reception, but we thought it would have some internet, even if it was at a coffee shop or something, turns out we were wrong.  So, with that said, I am sorry for not updating this blog like I had wanted to.

Now the update, the second half of the ride from St. George, Utah to Ouray, Colorado was a blast, we hit Zion and Moab on the way and took so amazing photos.  The new IMS ADV 1 foot pegs really proved their worth considering every bike we took weighed north of 500 pounds (except the TE310).  Having the extra leverage from the wider and longer foot pegs really helped to maneuver the big bikes around and made even the novice and inexperienced on big bike riders feel much more at ease.  The panniers worked great, no locks burst open or got stuck and all of our stuff stayed put the entire time, and the fit and finish really held up to a good amount of abuse.  The Overland Jacket and Pants really came into their own on the off road rides, they allowed plenty of airflow in the hot weather we were in, and kept us from sweating to bad or dehydrating our selves.  The SIDI Armada boots did a great job, even though they are primarily geared more towards street riding (the Touring part of the Adventure/Touring segment) they still did very well in the dirt.  They provided good ankle support and shin protection while also giving the rider a full range of motion.  Now if you smack your foot hard on a rock you feel it, but nothing short of a full moto boot would be any better.  The helmets and googles did very well as well, providing protection and ventilation as well as a clear line of sight.

We did have a little to much fun out in the desert, and as a result we were a little late coming into Ouray, and the last 30 miles or so were on dirt roads in the dark.  As a result one of the guys had a accident, and ended up in a ditch.  The bike, a 2010 F800GS, survived with only a little damage, and the rider mounted back up .

In Ouray itself we got a chance to ride up and over Engineers pass.  I have heard that this ride can be tough, rocks, ice, snow, standing water, ect.  and the Triumph Tiger as well as the rest of the BMW bikes handled it great.  The Husky TE310 was really in its element, but considering every other bike there outweighed it by 200 pounds, it wasn’t really fair.

Now, my personal bike, the Triumph Tiger 800XC has been completely worked over in the suspension department.  The Touratech rear shock was amazing.  I came off of riding a Baja prepped XR650R dual sport to this bike, and lets just say, once the Tiger was moving I could have been back on my 650.  The same goes for the Precision Concepts Front Forks.  The stock front end is very soft, but with the suspension gurus working at Precision Concepts with all of their race know how, the front end was perfect.  The engine, very linear, and tons of power, was a little tricky to control at first at least for me.  I was used to the tractor like low end torque of the 650 single in my XR, but after a few miles of riding the Tiger I was able to adapt and was soon kicking out the rear end and powering out of corners like a real racer (at least in my mind).  All that to say the Tiger is a great ADV bike, very capable in the dirt, and a excellent almost sport bike like ride, on the street.

Now today is the day that we are heading back and I was able to get a few minutes of internet to write this, but since we are trying to do the entire ride back to Yucaipa in one day I don’t have a ton of time to post pics.  But I promise more will come in the next few days, until then happy and safe riding.

And We Are Off!

So yesterday was a big day, not only was it Father’s Day but it marked the start of the Two Day ride from Yucaipa to Ouray, CO.  Overall things went great.  No accidents, no dehydration, no problems.  The Klim Jackets and Pants did great.  Now nothing aside from true A/C is going to keep you from feeling hot in the 100 degree weather that we experienced riding through Barstow to Vegas.  But once you unzipped the jackets a few inches, and opened up all the vents, it did a really good job getting decent airflow regardless of the model (Overland, Traverse and Badlands Pro).  Our Camel Backs full of ice helped to keep us hydrated by providing a constant trickle of cold water and helped keep our backs cool as well.  The SIDI boots were incredibly comfortable, and the Gore Tec lining did as advertised, and keeper our feet dry and fairly sweat free.  The KLIM helmet did a great job.  An open face helmet at highway speed does have some drawbacks, namely wind noise and things hitting your face at 65mph plus hurts, but it did give you extra air flow to keep your head from sweating to much.  And a good set of headphones or ear plugs do wonders at reducing the wind noise.  Our Seat Concepts seats were worth every penny, after a 6 hour plus ride, those of us lucky enough to have the Seat Concepts seats felt a lot better then those that did not, and could have easily done a few more hours.

Lastly the new IMS ADV 1 foot pegs were great, they gave us a huge platform to move our feet around while seated, giving us the much needed room to move to avoid leg cramps and general discomfort, and the extra leverage they provided really did wonders in the dirt.  I leave you with a few snap shots of the ride, and not to worry, there will be plenty more to come.

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Gear part 2

Getting that box in the mail is always exciting, but when it contains Touratech Zaga Pro 45 liter bags, it is even better.  Thanks to Touratech for these Triumph Specific bags.  They are very well built, as are all items from Touratech, they will swallow a full helmet without a hitch, and give the bike a more aggressive, Adventure stature.  They are also locking, so you don’t have to worry about your valuables disappearing if you leave something in them, and they pivot open, making it very easy to get your items in and out.  On top of all of that, a KLIM set of goggles, neck warmer, and aggressor undershirt, just round out the package.  Once again thanks to all the companies that made it possible.

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GEAR part 1

Everyone loves new gear.  Nothing beats opening that box from the mail, or picking up that perfect helmet or jacket from the dealer and putting it on and thinking, “Oh yeah, that works.”  That is how we feel about the awesome KLIM gear that we have for this ride.  We are all outfitted with KLIM F4 ECE Helmets, they offer great protection, do not interfere with your peripheral vision, and looks the part.  Our Jackets and Pants are all KLIM as well, we’ll be using some of their Overland Gear, as well as their Traverse and Scott, the owner at IMS, will be rocking a Badlands Pro Jacket. They offer great ventilation from the multiple zippers that open up and allow great air flow, with out compromising safety, a theme you will notice about KLIM gear throughout this post.  The arms can get a little hot but by simply undoing the velcro straps at the wrist and forearm opens up the jacket to amazing airflow with out compromising your safety (again).  Inside the jacket on the right hand side is a zippered mesh pocket with a small hole on the top.  It quickly become apparent that KLIM has not forgot that for many of us our ADV bikes do not have speakers to allow us to listen to our favorite music.  But you can easily fit a iPod, iPhone, Android, or whatever electronic device you have in the pocket, zip it up, and have a place for the headphone wires to come out of, with out (once again) compromising your safety.  This is a great option to have on long rides with open face helmets, since the wind noise can become tedious after a while.  I will up date this post with more pictures as I get them, until then enjoy the few pics of one of the Helmets we will be wearing, as well as some of the gear.

 

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Yucaipa, CA to Ouray, CO and back. The Pre-ride.

Life sometimes can take you down unexpected and strange paths.  It reminds me of a old Lord of The Rings saying, “All who wander are not lost.”  My life has been an interesting roller coaster, I moved my family to Yucaipa to work for IMS Products, but life had a different path for me.  I am now back to teaching elementary school and will be moving back to Monterey, CA in a few weeks, but before that happens I will be making my first adventure ride.  Scott Wright of IMS, myself, and 6 other men will be making a 2 day 850 mile ride from Yucaipa, CA to Ouray, CO for a church men’s retreat with Wildwood Calvary Chapel.  Two of the six men will be riding in the chase truck towing a 16 foot trailer big enough for 4 ADV bikes to fit in.  One of them, Chris Hardin GM of IMS, will be a trade out rider for anyone that gets tired, where as Tim Fogle will be the permanent chase truck guy.  It should prove to be a very interesting and awesome trip and I can’t wait to get started.  So with out further mumbling on my part, here is the list of men, the bikes that they ride, and a little photo shoot of the bike I will be riding, as more pics and info come I will keep this updated so keep a keen eye out, this should be fun.

The Bikes and Men:

There is me on my 2014 Green Triumph Tiger 800XC

Scott Wright men’s pastor and owner of IMS Products on a 2014 BMW 1200GSA.

Chris Hardin Manager of IMS Products and his 2009 Husky TE310 (he won’t be riding that bike, simply because of comfort)

Mark Schlichter on his personal 2010 BMW800.

Jeremy Fogle 2014 1200GSA (on loan from BMW of Escondido)

Keith Morabito on a 2014 BMW 800GSA (also on loan from BMW of Escondido)

The Gear:

For this ride we have been completely outfitted (minus boots) with Klim Overland Pants and Jackets, as well as Klim Helmets, F4 ECE to be exact.  This is something we are all very excite about and very grateful to Klim for the equipment.  These pants and jacket are very well ventilated, so even in the heat of the Vegas Desert we should be nice and cool.  The jackets come equipped with a back protecter, and elbow and shoulder armor, and lots of pockets for storing things.  The Pants have tons of pockets, several vents, as well as hip and knee protection.  We are hopeful that we never have to find out how good the armor is but it is better to have it and not need it then need it and not have it.

The Plan:

Our plan of attack is to leave Sunday the 15 at around 2pm and then hit Vegas for some IMS promotional shots and videos. Then bomb out to Saint George Utah for the night. The next day we will be hitting Moab and Zion on the way to Ouray. Once at the camp we plan on going over Engineer Pass and a few other yet to be determined rides. We will be there from the 17-21 when we leave to ride the full 850 miles back in one day.
As we prepare I will post more pics and info but now for what you all really want to see the bikes, or at least one of them, my personal Tiger 800XC.

I have added a RS4 Yoshimura exhaust, Alt Rider guards, Precision Concepts redone front suspension and Touratech rear shock, TKC80 front and rear tires, Renthal Twinwall Handlebars, Cycra Hand guards, and a very comfy Seat Concepts seat. I will be wearing KLIM Overland Pants and Jacket and a KLIM Helmet.

On top of all of this IMS has loaned me a set of their Rally Adventure bike foot pegs. I will get some pics when they arrive but let me say I have ridden with them on this bike before and they are great, big, lots of grip, and easy on the eyes. Scott Wright will have a set of the new Adventure Pegs on his 1200GSA as soon as they are finished. He told me they should be really cool with a special shape just for big ADV bikes. I will keep this updated as things develop.

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This is Scott Wright’s BMW 1200GSA

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The changing state of things.

In life change is inevitable. The same is true for technology of every kind.  As time goes on things change, sometimes it is good, sometimes not so much.  If we look at the advancement of Dirt Bikes, we have moved from 500lb Harley Davison Hardtails,

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to slightly lighter BSA and Triumph Desert sleds,

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to dual shock Japanese dirt bikes,

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to the current crop of ultra light, single shock, single cylinder, 300 foot jumping dirt bikes.

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At this point we could ask the question is there really anywhere else to go?  Is all that is left to do just small changes in frame and engines?  We can look at the new Honda CRF450R, a great bike, but is it really all that much different then all the other dirt bikes out there.  The basics are the same, some things got moved around but is it the same leap forward that the dual shock to single shock was?  Is it the same as moving from no rear suspension at all on old Harleys to the 3-4 inches that Triumph had?

The big question as I see it is what happens when a company is truly innovative?  I look at the Husky TE449/511.  Husky decided to throw out the rule book and make something different (yes I know they stole it from BMW but just hang with me).  The gas tank in the back, the sprocket on the same pivot as the swing arm, air box in the front.  Now David Knight couldn’t ride the thing, but is that because it is truly bad or is it because most of us that ride were brought up on more traditional bikes that have different handling characteristics?  Take a kid with no other riding experience and natural talent (like Knight), teach him to ride solely on a Husky TE449 and you would have an award winning champion on a “impossible” bike.  And what doesn’t work in racing may work in other things, like Dual Sport riding.

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Yamaha has been one of the chief innovators of things that work that are different, such as one of the first mass produced single shock dirt bikes, and now they have the backwards engine.  Yeah it is different then other bikes, it steers with the front wheel more, but is that necessarily a bad thing?  With the new crop of riders coming up that have not been riding a “normal” bike their whole lives, maybe now is the time to try something new?  I love innovation, it is one of the things that makes America great, we embrace and encourage new ideas.  Before we decide if something isn’t good just because it is different, maybe we should try it out, give it a shot, todays “weird” is tomorrows normal.

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New Projects in the Works

Well things here are IMS are getting exciting.  As of now we have come out with a new tank for the CRF450R

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The CRF250L

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The TE/TC/TXC449/511

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As well as the Beta 300/450RR tank.

ImageSo all in all it has been quite the exciting 5 months.  IMS is working full steam ahead doing what we do best, and that is make tanks and make them well.  But now we have ventured out into new and exciting territory, the side by side, or UTV.  Since it first came out the RZR has dominated the UTV scene, fast, handles great, and can take up to 4 people in style.  But like all race machines it seems to suffer from one major flaw, fairly low MPG.  Now maybe stock it isn’t to bad, but if you are like the guys that work at IMS, you can leave it stock for long.  Engine mods make more speed, but speed burns more gas, and for some of the extreme turbo RZRs out there I have heard of people getting as low as 7.5 MPG.  So what do you do when you only got a 7.5 gallon tank and that kind of MPG, most of us have had to resort to the good ole gas can, or just not ride for very long.  The gas can seems ok, but after seeing pictures like this

Imagekind of makes me think that that extra can of fuel on a bed that can get pretty hot due to exhaust and turbo heat might not be a great idea.  So that just leaves you with short rides.  Let figure this out, if you got a full decked out turbo RZR and get 7.5 MPG and a 7.5 gallon tank that means you have, at best, 56.25 miles of riding.  That means no later then 28.125 miles you have to turn around and head back.  And when you have a machine with that kind of power and speed you are looking at a very very short riding day.  On top of that you can not get any further then 28.125 miles away from camp, not a whole lot of exploring.

There is a third option now coming out, and IMS has it.  We are currently working on a auxiliary tank (so an easy install) that will increase the total fuel capacity of the RZR to 12-13 gallons.  Since the tank will be installed near the stock tank, it is in just as safe a place as the stock tank.  We know people have been asking for this tank for a while and we are pleased to announce that we are finally doing it.  It still has at least 30 days till production but we will keep you posted as to when it is available and the total gallons you will get.  We hope you guys are as excited as we are.

Here are a few pics to help you out.

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Taking out the Trash

Ok, I am not going on a rant here.  I just wanted to talk about something that was near and dear to my heart as well as to many off road riders out there.  That is the trails that we ride and the trash that we find.  This is prompted by a recent ride I did on one of my favorite trail systems.  I was just riding along getting near the end of the trail where it hits the road, when I crossed this beautiful little stream.  Now recently I have decided that I was going to try to become a professional “Free Camera App iPhone Photo Taker” so I stopped to take a picture with my XR in the middle of a stream, because that would look cool.  Anyway here I was taking pictures walking around my Dual Sport when I walked up the stream a little to get a more dramatic shot when I looked over and saw it, a nice little collection of trash (primarily water bottles and a few miscellaneous other things).  This really made me sad, and at first I was just going to leave, after all I had nothing to carry the trash in to properly dispose of it, but at the last second before I left I decided to take a picture and post it up here, hoping to raise awareness to this problem.

 

A few months ago I had posted a picture of my mountain bike on a local ride I did and commented on how so many trails that had been formed by off road riders had been shut down and how if we don’t figure out how to fix it more and more will continue to get shut down.  I see things like this and honestly can understand why.  This area is absolutely beautiful, (as this photo hopefully shows) and if you look not too closely you can see the first bit of trash that caught my eye laying on the bank in front of my bike, a little white trash bag.

 

Now I said I wasn’t going to rant, and I am not.  I realize that just a few days before this ride was a holiday weekend and there was a lot of campers, and maybe someone was riding out of this trail with a bag full of trash and it got caught and ripped open and they didn’t notice.  Who knows, all I can say is that it was there and if we don’t take care of our trails then eventually they will get shut down, and I totally understand.  Who wants their trails to look like this.

 

It is true that every once in awhile I do find cool things on the trail, once I found the remains of a car front seat set up so that whoever sat there got an amazing sunset view, (when I found it it was just a rusted bunch of metal but I could see the potential) and I understand that, it was right near a campsite.  (If you want to read about some really neat trail finds click here http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/847470-weirdcreepy-things-youve-found-on-the-trail/)  All I am trying to say is if you pack it in, pack it out.  Like I learned in sixth grade Science and Conservation Camp, (yes I was that kid still kind of am) “Take only photos, leave only footprints.”  Keep it safe and ride clean.  

So to conclude what do you guys think we should do to keep our trails clean and open for years to come?

 

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